Tag Archives: Stock

Homemade stock – a heavenly thing

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At some point during the last couple of years I decided that I did not want to keep using store bought stock. It is full of salt, taste enhancers and chemicals and I wanted to do something else. So I started looking at making my own stock and I thought it would be a lot more difficult that it is. But it is really not. I have even found that it helps me use more of the scraps that you get in a normal household. I use my freezer to save scraps from preparing and carving meat, bits of bacon, vegetables gone soft, spinach and herb stems from my garden and so on. All good things that you can use.

Homemade stock

Actually you can use a wide variety of ingredients but these are some of the ones I use.

Ingredients:

For 4 pots giving about 1.5 liters after reducing.

8 carrots – two pr. pot

4-8 onions including peels – 1-2 pr. pot

1-2 leeks – 1/2 pr. pot

Pork or beef scraps – as many as you have and evenly distributed among the pots

Spinach stems

Asparagus gone soft

Bacon scraps – as many as you have and evenly distributed among the pots

Ginger

Herbs

Garlic

Peppercorns

No salt – I don’t use salt as I prefer to add the salt to the dish the stock is going into. It also prevents that your stock gets too salty when reducing.

Some of the ingredients for stock
Some of the ingredients

You start of by searing the meat scraps and then you add the rest of the ingredients chopped into chunky pieces except herbs.

After searing add rest of ingredients exept herbs.
After searing add rest of ingredients except herbs.
The stock looks good already.
The stock looks good already.

After searing the ingredients with the meat for a bit add the herbs.

Add herbs to the stock.
Add herbs.
A good amount of parsley helps any stock.
A good amount of parsley helps any stock.

Add as much water as the pots can hold and bring to a boil. Leave at a slow boil.

Add water to the stock.
Add water to the stock.

When the stock is boiling remember to skim of the foam. There is a lot of grit in the foam and it is not nice to eat. So at regular intervals skim the foam into a bowl and throw it out.

The no good foam.
The no good foam.

It is looking good and you just have to wait for it to reduce. This is the part that takes time but it is something that can more or less mind itself. You just need to check on it once in a while.

Good stock.
Good stock.
Really good stock.
Really good stock.

As it reduces I empty the pots into each other. I try to keep as many of the ingredients but at some point they will not fit any more. At that point drain the liquid through a strainer into a pot. There is no more use for the vegetables unless you have pigs or chickens you can feed them to. If you make vegetable stock you can put it on your compost but if there is meat it has to go in the bin.

You now need to reduce the liquid until you have a stock with an intense flavor. For me 10 liters become about 1.5 liters of good stock.

1.5 liters of reduced stock.
1.5 liters of reduced stock.

Then the big question becomes – how do you save it in a way that allows you to use it over time. Some use bottles and keep it refrigerated and that works well if you plan to use it in the near future. I need it to keep longer than that so I use ice cube bags and put it in the freezer. I can then take the cubes I need for the dish I am doing.

Stock in icecube bags.
Stock in ice cube bags.
Frozen stock.
Frozen stock.

I make stock 3-4 times a year and I find that it is time well spent because it tastes great, helps me use scraps and helps me avoid some of the nasty  things in store bought stock.

I hope I have inspired you to experiment with your own stock – enjoy Sara

 

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